Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation, and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution

Dunayevskaya, Raya
Publisher:  Humanities Press, Atlantic Highlands
Year First Published:  {12407 Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation, and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution ROSA LUXEMBURG WOMENS LIBERATION AND MARXS PHILOSOPHY OF REVOLUTION Dunayevskaya, Raya Humanities Press Atlantic Highlands Part I - Rosa Luxemburg as Theoretician, as Activist, as Internationalist. Part II - The Women's Liberation Movement as Revolutionary Force and Reason. Part III - Karl Marx: From Critic of Hegel to Author of Capital and Theorist of "Revolution in Permanence." 1981 1982 234pp BC12407-WomensLiberation.jpg B Book 0-391-02793-X HX273.L83D86 1982 355.4 Dunayevskaya writes: By mid-August, when Luxemburg was working on The Mass Strike, the Party and the Trade Unions, it was clear that, far from the pamphlet's being restricted to the topics in the title, Luxemburg was, in fact, beginning to question not just the conservative trade union leadership, but the relation of Marxist leadership to spontaneity. She had always been highly responsive to proletarian acts of spontaneity. What was different this time was that the 1905 Revolution had disclosed a totally new relationship also to Marxist leadership. The most exciting phenomenon was that the so-called backward Russian worrkers had proved themselves far in advance of those in the technologically advanced countries, particularly Germany. Moreover, the Russian Revolution was not just a national happening. In its impact on both East and West, it had displayed an elemental force and reason of world scope. Luxemburg at once began working out its application to Germany. <br>It a word, spontaneity did not mean just instinctive action as against conscious direction. Quite the contrary: spontaneity was a driving force, not only of revolution but of the vanguard leadership, keeping it left. As Luxemburg expressed in her pamphlet: "The element of spontaneity, as we have seen, plays a great part in all Russian mass strikes without exception, be it as a driving force or as a restraining influence... In short, in the mass strikes in Russia, the element of spontaneity plays such a predominant part, not becuase the Russian proletariat are 'uneducated,' but because revolutions do not allow anyone to play schoolmaster with them." CX6547 0 true true false CX6547.htm [0xc0002bfe60 0xc000470ba0 0xc0004cfd70 0xc00040f440 0xc000097860 0xc000241dd0 0xc00014f950 0xc0001688a0 0xc00083ccc0 0xc00086af60 0xc0007e2c00 0xc0007f1cb0 0xc000153200 0xc00046eab0 0xc00049d0b0 0xc00049db90 0xc0004f0c90 0xc0004f12f0 0xc0008c44e0 0xc0008c5aa0 0xc00058a3c0 0xc0006bb0e0 0xc000b40c00 0xc0000f1440 0xc0000f18f0 0xc00053f980 0xc000c816b0 0xc0005a3560 0xc00068fb30 0xc000da8150 0xc0011088d0 0xc0011356e0 0xc0006a0420 0xc000e778f0 0xc0011be510 0xc0001660c0 0xc000ffc810 0xc001087890 0xc0014e9ec0 0xc001558240 0xc001658900 0xc0016e76b0 0xc0019f3200 0xc001313d70 0xc00132f950 0xc001359a40 0xc001367530 0xc0013750b0 0xc000d4a900 0xc000d922d0 0xc0011cb350 0xc001d0e6f0 0xc001eee090 0xc001f85320 0xc0022a69f0 0xc000bb7470 0xc001325770 0xc00139f890 0xc001c1b950 0xc001c8f050 0xc001e18b40 0xc001e61110 0xc002313dd0 0xc002366360 0xc0024e2bd0 0xc0025542a0 0xc0025f2ea0 0xc002637470 0xc000387e00 0xc00061b1d0 0xc00070ba10 0xc000981620 0xc000e2d5c0 0xc000e85aa0 0xc001355380 0xc001ca54a0 0xc002319ad0 0xc002372000 0xc0023b1170 0xc002413830 0xc002452330 0xc00247aea0 0xc0024bcc90 0xc0024e01b0 0xc0024e16e0 0xc00272dd10 0xc002764990 0xc00279ea80] Cx}
Year Published:  1982
Pages:  234pp   ISBN:  0-391-02793-X
Library of Congress Number:  HX273.L83D86 1982   Dewey:  355.4
Resource Type:  Book
Cx Number:  CX6547

Part I - Rosa Luxemburg as Theoretician, as Activist, as Internationalist. Part II - The Women's Liberation Movement as Revolutionary Force and Reason. Part III - Karl Marx: From Critic of Hegel to Author of Capital and Theorist of "Revolution in Permanence."

Abstract: 
Dunayevskaya writes: By mid-August, when Luxemburg was working on The Mass Strike, the Party and the Trade Unions, it was clear that, far from the pamphlet's being restricted to the topics in the title, Luxemburg was, in fact, beginning to question not just the conservative trade union leadership, but the relation of Marxist leadership to spontaneity. She had always been highly responsive to proletarian acts of spontaneity. What was different this time was that the 1905 Revolution had disclosed a totally new relationship also to Marxist leadership. The most exciting phenomenon was that the so-called backward Russian worrkers had proved themselves far in advance of those in the technologically advanced countries, particularly Germany. Moreover, the Russian Revolution was not just a national happening. In its impact on both East and West, it had displayed an elemental force and reason of world scope. Luxemburg at once began working out its application to Germany.
It a word, spontaneity did not mean just instinctive action as against conscious direction. Quite the contrary: spontaneity was a driving force, not only of revolution but of the vanguard leadership, keeping it left. As Luxemburg expressed in her pamphlet: "The element of spontaneity, as we have seen, plays a great part in all Russian mass strikes without exception, be it as a driving force or as a restraining influence... In short, in the mass strikes in Russia, the element of spontaneity plays such a predominant part, not becuase the Russian proletariat are 'uneducated,' but because revolutions do not allow anyone to play schoolmaster with them."

Subject Headings

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