Say "No" to Uranium Mining

Year Published:  1978  
Resource Type:  Article
Cx Number:  CX843

This statement, endoresed by thirty-seven anti-nuclear and public interest groups in Saskatchewan, outlines the dangerous effects of the expasion of the uranium industry in Saskatchewan and calls for an immediate halt to the opening of new mines.

Abstract:  This statement, endoresed by thirty-seven anti-nuclear and public interest groups in Saskatchewan, outlines the dangerous effects of the expasion of the uranium industry in Saskatchewan and calls for an immediate halt to the opening of new mines.
The paper begins by stating that there are a number of viable non-nuclear power resources (both renewable and non-renewable) in the world. Solar, wind and biomass energy development have been shown to be capable of creating more employment than would development of more capital-intensive energy sources.
The paper indicates that, while the tax dollars of the people of saskatchewan are being used to build support services for the expansion of the foreign-owned industry, no major royalties will come into the provincial treasury until the nuclear industry has recovered its costs.
The statement also points out that northerners gain little from these resource extraction projects and that native people in particular suffer a negative social impact and a further loss of independence. Northern development is thus expressed in higher prices, disruption of the existing economy, outflow of profits and increased alcoholism and prostitution.
Ninety per cent of Canadian uranium now goes into the world market where it can end up supplying unstable authoritarian governments with nuclear weapons material. Simply put, the expansion of the nuclear industry is increasing the chance of nuclear war. This statement also refers to recent studies in the United States which indicate higher rates of cancer and lukemia among uranium miners and among those living near nuclear power stations. At this point in history, there exists no method of safe disposal for radioactive wastes. These materials can remain toxic for thousands of years.
The statement concludes that, generally, the Bayda Inquiry did not give these issues serious consideration; even more seriously, it neglected to give the people of the province an opportunity to participate in the inquiry. "Time must be allowed for everyone in Saskatchewan to become fully informed and to give their opinion on the nuclear issue." The authors of this statement are seeking support and comments around this issue as well as specific endorsement of the statement from those who share their concern.
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