Strategies for Canadian Economic Self-Reliance
Alternative Paths to Jobs, Development, Equality and Peace

Bradfield, M.; Dillon, J.; Gindin, Sam; Lockhart, A.
Publisher:  Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Ottawa, Canada
Year Published:  1985  
Pages:  52pp   Price:  $5   ISBN:  0-88627-047-2
Dewey:  330.971
Resource Type:  Book
Cx Number:  CX3215

Examines "the reality which lies behind the myth of increased international competitiveness and attempts to spell out the implication of a radically different model of development -- termed the self-reliant model --for different aspects of Canadian economy.

Abstract:  The four essays in STRATEGIES FOR CANADIAN ECONOMIC SELF-RELIANCE examine "the reality which lies behind the myth of increased international competitiveness and attempts to spell out the implication of a radically different model of development --termed the self-reliant model--for different aspects of Canadian economy." The authors argue that the costs of the "international competitiveness" approach will be borne preponderantly by workers who must accept lower wages to compete with their brothers and sisters in the newly industrializing countries, and by those who are most dependent on social services. The benefits, on the other hand , will go to those who are already wealthy and powerful.

STRATEGIES argues in favour of a different economic strategy based on greater self-sufficiency. The case is made that for Canada, as for Third World countries, increased production for trade, rather than for domestic consumpiton, reduced living standards and creates dependency.

The authors suggest what form a strategy based on increased self-reliance might take. One essay looks at how such a strategy might apply to less developed regions of Canada such as the Maritimes, and looks critically at the assumption that megaprojects are a way for less developed regions to develop. Experiements such as the Mondragon co-operative in Spain are suggested as one alternative model.

STRATEIES also acknowledges the difficulties of taking an alternative economic path, especially in the context of an international economy dominated by multinational corporations, institutions of international finance, and powerful entrenched national self-interest.



Table of Contents

Introduction
Planned Trade and Greater Self-Sufficiency
Self-Reliance for Third World Countries
Northern Development Policy: Self-Reliance versus Dependency
The Myths of Foreign Finance and Technology
Notes on Authors
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