Access to Housing, A Regional Perspective

Publisher:  Social Planning & Research, United Way of the Lower Mainland, Vancouver, Canada
Year Published:  1980  
Pages:  40pp  
Resource Type:  Article
Cx Number:  CX2244

This report is the result of two concerns. On the one hand, it is a response to the perceived lack of information of the needs not being met by the current housing market in the lower mainland region of BC. Under current government programs, local voluntary organizations have a great deal of responsibility for developing, at the local level, special needs housing projects. The second main concern of the report is to examine the problems facing these voluntary organizations and the availability of resources at their disposal.

Abstract:  This report is the result of two concerns. On the one hand, it is a response to the perceived lack of information of the needs not being met by the current housing market in the lower mainland region of BC. Under current government programs, local voluntary organizations have a great deal of responsibility for developing, at the local level, special needs housing projects. The second main concern of the report is to examine the problems facing these voluntary organizations and the availability of resources at their disposal.

This study is said to be the first phase of an ongoing planning process. This first phase has as its aim the assessment of the living environment needs of those people having "special housing needs". The main research method was a series of interview with consumers and people who work with them. The ultimate aim is to provide information to local (voluntary), municipal and regional authorities in order to facilitate their efforts in meeting special needs housing concerns.

In addition to gathering information, it is hoped that the report will promote action. The report calls for cooperative action amongst the three levels of organization in order to: make more effective use of existing housing programs and resources to actually develop housing projects at the local level; monitor government programs directed at special housing needs and press for changes to improve such programs; develop a strong regional advocacy body to speak out on special needs housing concerns."

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