Violence Against Women: Why The UN Secretary-General Got It Wrong

Burrowes, Robert J.
http://www.countercurrents.org/2017/12/06/violence-against-women-why-the-un-secretary-general-got-it-wrong/

Publisher:  Countercurrents
Date Written:  06/12/2017
Year Published:  2017  
Resource Type:  Article
Cx Number:  CX22200

Burrowes argues that efforts to resolve violence aganist women are futile unless the focus shifts to preventing emotional and physical violence against children, with particular emphasis on boys.

Abstract: 
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Excerpt:

In his remarks on the recent International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women – see'Violence Against Women is Fundamentally About Power'– United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres inadvertantly demonstrated why well-meaning efforts being undertaken globally to reduce violence against women fail to make any progress in addressing this pervasive crisis.

Hence, while the UN might be 'committed to addressing violence against women in all its forms' as he claimed, and the UN might have launched a range of initiatives over the past twenty years, including awarding $129 million to 463 civil society initiatives in 139 countries and territories through the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against women, his own article acknowledges that 'Attacks on women are common to developed and developing countries. Despite attempts to cover them up, they are a daily reality for many women and girls around the world.' ...

...So what is happening psychologically for the rapist when they commit the act of rape? In essence, they are projecting the (unconsciously suppressed) feelings of their own victimhood onto their rape victim. That is, their fear, self-hatred and powerlessness, for example, are projected onto the victim so that they can gain temporary relief from these feelings. Their fear, temporarily, is more deeply suppressed. Their self-hatred is projected as hatred of their victim. Their powerlessness is temporarily relieved by a sense of being in control, which they were never allowed to be, and feel, as a child. And similarly with their other suppressed feelings. For example, a rapist might blame their victim for their dress: a sure sign that the rapist was endlessly, and unjustly, blamed as a child and is (unconsciously) angry about that.

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