The Freeland-Chomiak Connection: "It takes a village to raise a Nazi"

Sanders, Richard
http://rabble.ca/babble/news-rest-us/freeland-chomiak-connection-it-takes-village-raise-nazi-0

Publisher:  Rabble
Date Written:  12/04/2017
Year Published:  2017  
Resource Type:  Article
Cx Number:  CX20651

Sanders uncovers Chrystia Freeland's, the Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs, own personal and professional connection with fascist groups and publications.

Abstract: 
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Excerpt:

But besides revealing many aspects of her maternal grandfather's support for the German war effort, this research exposes shocking new information about Chrystia Freeland's own career as a propagandist. To decide whether Freeland is suitable as a Foreign Affairs minister, Canadians should explore this research which documents her longstanding ties to extremely Russophobic organisations that are deeply rooted in the Ukrainian fascist tradition which predates WWII. Canadians should also be aware that during the early years of her journalistic career Freeland wrote for ultranationalist Ukrainian publications linked not only to her grandfather and other fascist collaborators, but to the CIA's mighty Wurlitzer propaganda machine.

For example, in 1986 at age 18, Freeland received a Canadian government-funded job writing articles for The Encyclopedia of Ukraine. This project was the postwar brainchild of her grandfather's WWII boss, Volodymyr Kubijovich. Kubijovich headed the top Ukrainian collaborationist network established and funded by Nazi's military intelligence agency, the Abwehr. Another publication, for which Freeland worked in the late 1980s, The Ukrainian News, had been edited by her grandfather (1981-1982). A third was the US-based Ukrainian Weekly, which has used thousands of items from Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, the best-known propaganda creature of the CIA. It featured Freeland's work on the same page as an ad for a book honouring the Nazi's Waffen SS Galicia Division as a heroic Ukrainian force fighting Germany's noble war against Soviet communism.

But besides showing that Freeland's ultranationalist-advocacy journalism often turned from the same page as that of her Nazi-propagandist grandfather, this report exposes a host of fascist skeletons still being hidden from public view in the large, interconnected wardrobes of Canada's postwar Ukrainian émigré community and the Government of Canada.

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